MD Program

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Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2600
Phone:(319) 335-8278
Fax: (319) 335-8643

  • Student Handbook

    Evaluations, Grades and Promotions

    1. Internal evaluations

    Evaluation of student progress in courses and clinical clerkships is based on a combination of written examinations, competency assessments, and direct observations by faculty and residents that are intended to provide summative evaluation of a student’s fund of knowledge, participation and professional comportment. Which assessments are utilized, their frequency and the relative weight attached to each component are features established by each department or course director.  These standards are presented to students during orientation at the beginning of each course or clerkship and are available in the printed syllabi provided by most course directors, as well as on the Web for some courses. Scholastic performance in all required courses or clerkships is generally recorded as follows: Honors (“H”); Near Honors (“H–”); Pass (“P”); and Fail (“F”).  A grade of “Incomplete” (I) will be recorded when the student has not completed some component of the course and the reason for non-completion is acceptable to the Course Director (e.g., absence from a class or examination due to illness or a serious personal emergency). The Course Director will determine the plan, including a schedule, for the student to complete their work. The maximum time allowed for finishing the “Incomplete” is to the end of the following semester. At this time the “Incomplete” (I) will become a failing grade (F) on the transcript. A grade of Incomplete should not be used as a temporary “placeholder” grade when the student’s performance in the course has been unsatisfactory. Information about a student's academic progress or behavior may be shared with faculty or staff if deemed necessary.

    General guidelines provided to the course directors and faculty suggests that the percentage of students achieving Honors or Near Honors as a final grade in a given course be limited to approximately 30%. The purpose of this suggestion is twofold. First, it encourages students to maintain or improve their performance throughout the semester. Second, the Near Honors grade allows the College to differentiate students who are near honors from those who have just passed. However, the final determination in this regard, either more or less than the suggested figure, is made by the course director and/or the responsible department.

    Promotion from one grading period to the next is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of courses in each preceding grading period. During the first two years of medical school, the curriculum is designed so that each successive semester builds upon the last. Students are expected to demonstrate readiness for the following semester by passing all courses in the previous semester. If a student receives an “Incomplete” or failing grade in one or more courses, the matter goes before the Promotions Committee for review and recommendation. The Promotions Committee will make a recommendation to the Executive Dean based on a review of information on each individual case. Part of that recommendation will include whether or not, and how, the student may continue on to the next semester. It is the general expectation that all students will complete the first two years of the curriculum within three years and, with the exception of students enrolled in combined degree programs, the entire curriculum within six years.

    Students are not permitted to proceed to the M3 year without satisfactorily completing all M2 year courses. Students are also not permitted to progress into the M4 year without successfully completing all clerkships (36 weeks) comprising the generalist core of clinical clerkships (Ambulatory Practice Module consisting of Community-Based Primary Care, Family Medicine and Outpatient Internal Medicine; Inpatient Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Surgery).

    2. External evaluations – The Carver College of Medicine’s policies on the United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE)

    All students must take and pass Step 1 of the USMLE in order to advance into the third year of the medical curriculum. The criteria for this requirement are as follows:

    1. Step 1 of the USMLE must be taken before June 30 at the start of the third year.
    2. Students who receive a failing score on Step 1 after the start of the third year will be allowed to complete their first clerkship of the third year.
    3. Students who fail Step 1 by more than 10 points or who have failed more than one course in the first two years are required to step out of the curriculum immediately after completing their first clerkship of the third year to prepare to retake the exam.
    4. Students who fail Step 1 by 10 points or less and who have failed no courses or only one course in the first two years may opt to continue in the M3 year curriculum.
    5. All students who fail Step 1 must take the examination for the second time by November 30 of the same year.
    6. Once the examination has been retaken, students are permitted to return to the curriculum pending the results of the reexamination.
    7. Any student failing the Step 1 exam a second time will not be permitted to continue in the curriculum until Step 1 has been taken for the third time AND a passing score has been recorded.
    8. The third attempt at Step 1 of the USMLE must be completed by May 30 of what would have been the student’s third year.
    9. Any student failing Step 1 of the USMLE for the third time will appear before the Promotions Committee for review and likely face dismissal on academic grounds.

    All students must also take and pass the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and the Clinical Skills exams in order to graduate. The criteria for this requirement are as follows:

    1. Both parts of Step 2 must be taken by December 31 of the M4 year.
    2. Any student failing Step 2 of the USMLE for the third time will appear before the Promotions Committee for review and likely face dismissal on academic grounds.

    3. Examinations

    Examinations are not only evaluative and summative but also educational and formative instruments, and students may have the opportunity to review their examination performance in order to learn from their mistakes as well as from their strengths.  Some directors, particularly of preclinical courses, choose to return examination papers to students for their review.  Other course directors review the examination in class, addressing particularly those questions which a significant percentage of the class answered incorrectly.  Clerkship directors are urged to provide a mechanism by which students can review their written examination performance.  Where appropriate, directors are encouraged to allow students to see the examination questions after the examination and to contest questions within a reasonable time limit.

    A student who has passed an examination cannot retake the examination to obtain a higher grade in the course or clerkship.

    4. Exam comment books

    Students usually have the opportunity to review exams to determine which questions they missed and to write the rationale for their choice of answers in "comment books" that are made available during non-class times, generally for the 2 days that follow the exam.  Guidelines for this process are determined by the Course Director.  All comments must be legible and signed.  For those courses in which a test bank of questions is maintained, students may not take any notes on the exam.  Course directors read student comments to determine whether adjustments need to be made on the scoring of the questions.

    5. Policies for students with disabilities

    This policy is linked from the Medical Student Counseling Center’s page:

    6. Policies regarding failed courses and clerkships

    A student who fails a course or clerkship will have the failing grade permanently on his/her academic transcript.  Students who fail a course or clerkship are sometimes required to appear before the Medical Student Promotions Committee.  More information on the Medical Student Promotions Committee is available below.

    M1 and M2 students who fail a basic sciences course generally are required to retake the entire course. Occasionally, however, a student is allowed to take a make-up exam as remediation for the failing grade rather than repeat the course.  In that circumstance, the failing grade remains on the transcript and the notation “Requirement in ______ (course name) satisfied _____ (date).”

    Depending upon the course and circumstances of the failing grade, the student may be given the option of taking a summer course approved by the sponsoring department at another institution or a Physician Assistant course at the University of Iowa. Only the student who fails a course is allowed to satisfy the course requirement by taking a summer course.

    Grades for repeated courses are assigned as follows:

    1. A student who repeats a failed course or clerkship in full at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine can achieve a grade of H, NH, P, or F if earned. This second grade does not replace the first failing grade on the transcript.  The second attempt is shown on the transcript with the grade earned and the second grade is included in honors hours point totals.
    2. If a student takes a Physician Assistant course as remediation for a failing grade, the grade earned in the PA course is Honors, Near Honors, Pass or Fail. The PA course is recorded on the transcript.  
    3. The grade earned in an approved summer course taken at another institution is recorded in the student’s academic file but is not recorded on the transcript or used to calculate honors point totals. The student’s transcript will contain the notation “Requirement in __________ (course name) satisfied at _____________ (school name) on ___________ (date).
    4. Students who fail the final examination in a required clerkship and repeat only the examination (the requirement to repeat the final examination must be outlined in the clerkship syllabus) are not eligible for Honors or Near Honors for the clerkship.    
    5. At most, students have until the end of the semester to repeat and pass a failed required clerkship final exam.
    6. Students in the last block of the semester who fail a required clerkship exam have up to six weeks to repeat the exam.
    7. A maximum of one retake of a final required clerkship exam is allowed and the retake will be the same format as the original examination, but not the identical examination.
    8. After a second final required clerkship exam failure, the student will receive a failing grade in the clerkship.

    7. Evaluation in clinical clerkships

    1. All required clerkships must have a formal mechanism for providing mid-clerkship feedback to students on their clinical performance.  This is a mandate from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.  This may be more difficult for the short clerkships, but some means of reviewing their performance with students at the end of the first week should be implemented.  In addition, all teaching faculty and residents should strive to give constructive feedback to students throughout the rotation. 
    2. Grading policies are effective for an academic year and cannot be changed in the middle of the year.  The same grading standard must apply to an entire student cohort.
    3. A student who fails a clinical clerkship will normally be required to appear before the Student Promotions Committee.  The clerkship director will also normally be asked to meet with the Promotions Committee to describe the circumstances of the student’s academic and clinical performance and to recommend appropriate remediation.  The Promotions Committee will give the director’s recommendation serious consideration, but the Committee’s recommendation to the Executive Dean will be based upon the student’s overall academic record, and may be more stringent than the clerkship director’s recommendation.  Thus the clerkship director should not give or imply any promises to the student regarding the means of remediation.

     8. AAMC transcript guidelines

    The Carver College of Medicine is in compliance with the transcript guidelines of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) as follows: 

    The academic transcript should reflect the total, unabridged academic history of the student at the institution. All courses should be recorded in the academic period in which the courses were taken and graded.

    The academic transcript should be “authentic,” i.e., it should reflect all official grades received by the student for all courses attempted at the institution, including grades that result from remediated or repeated courses. For example:

    A grade of “Incomplete” (I) will be recorded when the student has not completed some component of the course and the reason for non-completion is acceptable to the Course Director (e.g., absence from a class or examination due to illness or a serious personal emergency). The Course Director will determine the plan, including a schedule, for the student to complete their work. The maximum time allowed for finishing the “Incomplete” is to the end of the following semester. At this time the “Incomplete” (I) will become a failing grade (F) on the transcript. A grade of Incomplete should not be used as a temporary “placeholder” grade when the student’s performance in the course has been unsatisfactory. A grade of “Fail” should be recorded for a course in which the student has not demonstrated competency or did not complete at a satisfactory level, as outlined in the course syllabus. A grade of Fail in a course should be a permanent grade; it should not be replaced on the transcript by a subsequent passing grade after the course has been remediated or repeated, even if the passing grade is accompanied by a special notation. The practice of replacing a grade of Fail on the transcript with a subsequent grade of Pass is inconsistent with total and unabridged grade reporting.

    9. The Medical Student Promotions Committee

    The purpose of the Medical Student Promotions Committee in academic promotions matters is to ensure that each person who graduates from The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine has adequate skills, knowledge, and judgment to assume the responsibilities of a medical doctor. To perform its duties, this committee will depend upon the cooperation, advice and judgment of faculty, students and administration.

    a. Composition of Student Promotions Committee

    The Student Promotions Committee shall consist of eight voting members. One member is designated the chair by the Dean of the College of Medicine. In addition, there shall be two members of the Medical Council and four other faculty members, two of whom shall be from basic science departments and two shall be from clinical departments. Faculty members on the Student Promotions Committee shall not be members of the Executive Committee nor shall they be members of the Appeals Committee.  Medical Council members of the Student Promotions Committee shall not serve on the Appeals Committee.  In addition to faculty, there shall be two medical student members, one from either the junior or senior class and one from the sophomore class. Students who serve must be in good academic standing and it is preferred that they have a history of good academic standing. The term of appointment for faculty is three years and for the student members one year.  Members may be reappointed.  Quorum for the Student Promotions Committee is five voting members.

    In addition to the eight voting members, the Associate Dean, the Assistant Deans, the College of Medicine Registrar, and the committee’s secretary will serve ex-officio without vote.

    b. The Medical Student Promotions process: information for students

    The Medical Student Promotions Committee may interview students for the following reasons:

    • Students who fail courses or clinical clerkships.
    • Unprofessional or unethical behavior such as plagiarism, dishonesty, theft, violation of patient confidentiality, not abiding by the law, etc.
    • Negative comments on clinical clerkship evaluations (1s and 2s, “unacceptable”). 
    • Persistently poor or marginal academic or clinical performance.
    • Failure to pass USMLE Step 1 after three attempts and within 12 months of what would have been the start of the M3 year.
    • Failure to pass USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills exams after three attempts and within 12 months of what would have been the student’s graduation date.
    • Requests to extend the period of study beyond the usual time allowed of 6 years (does not include students in combined degree programs).
    • Former students applying for reinstatement to the College within 5 years of withdrawal or dismissal.  Former students may apply for reinstatement only one time per calendar year.
    • Cases referred by the Honor Council.
    • Other purposes as determined by the OSAC Deans in consultation with the Promotions Committee chair.
    c. Appearing before the Medical Student Promotions Committee
    • Usually students are given several days notice of the date, location and tentative time of their interview with the Promotions Committee.  Occasionally, however, there are instances when advance notice is not possible and students are expected to appear for the interview on the day they are contacted.
    • Students may consult in advance of the Promotions Committee meeting with one or more of the OSAC Deans, the OSAC Registrar or an OSAC counselor for information on the Promotions Committee process.  
    • Students may provide a written statement and/or letters of support in advance of the Committee meeting.  Students may choose to contact an OSAC counselor for assistance in drafting a statement.  Such materials should be delivered or emailed to the Promotions Committee Secretary at least the day before the meeting.
    • Students are expected to answer questions posed by Promotions Committee members during the interview.  In addition, if desired, students may bring a prepared statement to read at the meeting.
    • If desired, students may bring one College of Medicine faculty or staff advocate, a counselor, or peer advocate who is allowed to speak briefly on their behalf.  Students asking a counselor to speak or to provide information on their behalf must sign a “Release of Information” form with the counselor to authorize such information to be released to the Committee. 
    • If desired, students may bring another person for support although the second person may not speak.
    • Students may not bring an attorney to the meeting.
    • The student or the advocate may not contact Promotions Committee members before or after the meeting with regard to their review or interview. 
    • OSAC staff who attend the meeting (OSAC Deans, OSAC Registrar and Promotions Committee secretary) are non-voting, ex-officio members of the Committee. 
    • Students who fail courses are subject to the Satisfactory Academic Progress policies of the Financial Aid Department.  Students are advised to review the policies in the student handbook related to an appearance before the Promotions Committee.
    d. Promotions Committee actions:
    • Following the interview with the student, Committee members will discuss the student’s situation and 1) vote on a recommendation to be sent to the Executive Dean (possible recommendations are outlined below under “Executive Dean’s Actions”) or 2) take no formal action.   
    • When voting on a recommendation, a quorum of voting members must be present at the meeting and a simple majority is required for passing a recommendation.
    • Promotions Committee members may recuse themselves from an interview and discussion on a student if they feel there may be a conflict of interest.
    • The Promotions Committee has the authority to recommend placing a student on academic probation and the authority to recommend removal of a student from academic probation.
    • An OSAC Dean will make every effort to notify the student of the Committee’s recommendation within 24 hours of the interview.  The notification will be by personal meeting, telephone call or email as the student prefers. 
    • Students may be contacted by an OSAC counselor or OSAC Dean to sign a Release of Information form to provide information to the Promotions Committee that documents progress in meeting Committee recommendations.
    • Official paperwork outlining the Committee’s recommendation will be delivered to the Executive Dean as soon as possible following the Promotions Committee meeting. 
    e. Executive Associate Dean’s Actions:
    • The Executive Dean of the College of Medicine will review the Promotions Committee’s recommendations.  Examples of recommendations and the Executive Dean’s actions are:
    1. require the student to repeat or otherwise remediate academic deficiencies
    2. require the student to undertake an extended academic schedule
    3. suspend the student or place the student on leave of absence for a specified time or until specific conditions are met
    4. allow the student to continue on a full academic schedule
    5. cancel the student’s registration in the College of Medicine
    6. other
    • A student may schedule an appointment with the Executive Dean to discuss the Promotions Committee’s recommendation prior to the Executive Dean’s decision.
    • The Executive Dean will make a decision on the recommendation within 21 working days of the Promotions Committee meeting and indicate that decision with his/her signature.
    • OSAC will provide official notification to the student of the Executive Dean’s decision within 3 working days of receiving the signed paperwork.
    • A student wishing to appeal the Executive Dean’s decision must submit a letter to the OSAC Associate Dean within 5 working days of receiving notification of that decision.
    f. Appeals Committee actions:
    • The Appeals Committee will convene to hear a student’s appeal of the Executive Dean’s decision within 3 weeks of that decision. 
    • Students may provide a written statement and/or letters of support in advance of the Appeals Committee meeting.  Such materials should be delivered or emailed to the Promotions Committee Secretary at least 5 working days before the Appeals Committee meeting.
    • Any supporting material considered to be “expert” must be written on professional letterhead, and the credentials of the expert must be provided within the expert opinion.  
    • Students are expected to answer questions posed by Appeals Committee members during the interview.  In addition, if desired, students may bring a prepared statement to read at the meeting.
    • If desired, students may bring one College of Medicine faculty or staff advocate, a Counselor, or a peer advocate who is allowed to speak briefly on their behalf. 
    • If desired, students may bring another person for support although the second person may not speak.
    • Students may not bring an attorney to the meeting.
    • The student or the advocate may not contact Appeals Committee members before or after the meeting with regard to their review or interview. 
    • The Chair of the Medical Student Promotions Committee will attend the Appeals Committee meeting and present the information used by the Promotions Committee in making their recommendation.  The OSAC Associate Dean will also provide information as needed and represent the College.  Both of these individuals are non-voting member of the Appeals Committee.
    • The recommendation of the Appeals Committee will be transmitted to the Dean of the College by the Chair of the Appeals Committee and the OSAC Associate Dean.
    g. The Dean’s Actions:
    • The Dean of the College will review the Appeals Committee’s recommendation and affirm, amend or reverse that recommendation within 5 working days from the date the student is notified in writing of the decision by the Appeals Committee.  The Dean will indicate that decision with his/her signature. 
    • OSAC will provide official notification to the student of the Dean’s decision within 3 working days of receiving the signed paperwork.
    • In the case of dismissal, the student will be removed from all courses or clerkships at this time.  The official effective date of the dismissal will be the date of the Executive Dean’s decision on the Promotions Committee’s recommendation. 
    • Only questions of due process may be appealed to the University of Iowa Provost’s Office. 
    h. Conflict of interest

    Student Promotions Committee: In the event of conflict of interest, real or perceived, members of the Student Promotions Committee will be expected to recuse themselves from the official proceedings of the committee.  Conflict of interest may be of a personal nature (e.g., friend, mentee, etc.) or academic (e.g., an evaluator of the student in question).

    Appeals Committee: In the event of conflict of interest, real or perceived, members of the Appeals Committee will be expected to recuse themselves from the official proceedings of the committee.  When possible, the chair of the committee should be notified of anticipated recusal in advance of the meeting, in order that an alternate member may be present to assure full representation and the existence of a quorum. Conflict of interest may be of a personal nature (e.g., friend, mentee, etc) or academic (e.g., an evaluator of the student in question).

    10. Policies on tutoring

    Tutor groups are available to all students and referrals to tutor groups occur throughout the semester.  Tutors are medical students who have already completed a course of study and have demonstrated their mastery of the material by obtaining Honors or Near Honors grade distinction for that course or are sponsored by the faculty director for that course.  On occasion, graduate students and residents are also available.  Tutors are responsible for facilitating the tutor group (approximately 8 -10 students), clarifying information, responding to student questions and helping students understand the material covered in class.  Team tutoring is an integral aspect of the success of the Medical Student Counseling Center’s (MSCC) tutor program as it enables a larger group of students to be served effectively.  Students who co-tutor a group are encouraged to maintain a group of 10 – 14 students over the course of the semester.  Tutoring groups that are smaller (less than 3 students for individual tutors and less than 6 students for team tutors) will be the preferred referral sources for the MSCC counselors when students request academic support and are not currently participating in a tutoring group.

    During the first week of classes students receive an e-mail containing the names of tutors for each course and additional information to help in selecting a tutor group (e.g. meeting times, preferred tutoring style, preferred number of students in the group, etc.) from the MSCC office.  The staff members of the MSCC office maintain a list of tutor groups over the course of the semester and are available to advise students if they have concerns or questions.  It is the students’ responsibility to contact the tutors on the list to obtain meeting times and arrange for group attendance.  The MSCC is notified by the tutor when the group is underutilized or full to facilitate student referrals.  Tutors and tutees are encouraged to contact the MSCC counselors if they have concerns about the progress of the group.  When students request academic counseling and report they are in academic distress, the counselors determine if a referral to an intensive tutoring group (three or less students per tutor) is appropriate.

    Counselors use the following criteria to determine if intensive tutoring is appropriate for the student:

    1. Any student who is on academic probation.
    2. Any student with a failing average in the course after two or more exams for which they are requesting intensive tutoring.
    3. Request of the course director.
    4. At the discretion of the counseling office, a student with a marginal passing average in a course (72% or below) who has been utilizing group tutoring.

    All of the above criteria assume that the student has been previously utilizing group tutoring.  If a student has not yet participated, a student will generally be placed initially in a standard tutor group.

    Tutor Training

    Tutors attend an orientation session at the beginning of each semester where tutoring guidelines and payroll information are communicated.  Tutors are paid for this time.

    Tutors attend professional development meetings hosted by the MSCC during the course of the semester.  Tutors are paid for this time.

    11. Medical Student Mistreatment

    The Carver College of Medicine provides students the highest quality medical education in the state’s premier academic medical center.  Students at the Carver College of Medicine can excel because the College maintains and expects an academic environment that is free from student mistreatment.

    The Carver College of Medicine's Medical Education Committee has used AMA guidelines to create the following definition of medical student mistreatment:

    Defining Mistreatment:

    On the behavioral level, mistreatment may be operationally defined as behavior by healthcare professionals and students which is exploitive or punishing.  For the purposes of this policy, examples of mistreatment include:

    • physical punishment, physical threats, or violence;
    • sexual harassment or sexual assault;
    • discrimination based on race, creed, color, national origin, age, sex, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity.
    • repeated episodes of psychological punishment of a student by a particular superior, such as public humiliation, threats, intimidation, or removal of privileges;
    • grading used to punish a student rather than to evaluate objective performance;
    • assigning tasks for punishment rather than educational purposes;
    • requiring the performance of personal services;
    • taking credit for another individual's work;
    • intentional neglect or intentional lack of communication.
    Reporting Mistreatment:

    Student mistreatment should be reported as follows:

    • Crimes.  Students who are the victims of misconduct that is also a crime are encouraged to contact the University’s Department of Public Safety (“DPS”).  http://police.uiowa.edu/  Students should call 911 in an emergency.  The Carver College of Medicine may refer allegations of mistreatment that may constitute criminal behavior to DPS.
    • Violence.  Students are encouraged to report incidents of violence to the College or to the University’s Department of Equal Opportunity and Diversity (“EOD”).  http://www.uiowa.edu/~eod/resolving/index.html  The Carver College of Medicine may refer allegations of mistreatment that may constitute a violation of the University’s violence policy to EOD for investigation and resolution.
    • Sexual Harassment/Assault.  Students are encouraged to report criminal incidents of sexual harassment or sexual assault to DPS.  http://police.uiowa.edu/  Complaints may also be forwarded to the College, to the University’s Department of Equal Opportunity and Diversity (“EOD”)  http://www.uiowa.edu/~eod/resolving/index.html, the Office of the Dean of Students http://dos.uiowa.edu/, or to the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator.  http://www.uiowa.edu/homepage/safety/sexual-misconduct.html  The Carver College of Medicine will refer allegations of sexual assault to the appropriate University office for investigation and resolution.  The College may refer allegations of sexual harassment to the appropriate University office for investigation and resolution.
    • Other Mistreatment:  All other types of mistreatment covered by this policy will be investigated and resolved by the Carver College of Medicine.
    Investigating and Resolving Mistreatment:

    Any student complaint concerning mistreatment should ideally be reported within 15 days of the event in question or within 15 days of completion of the clerkship/rotation/course, whichever is shorter.  The student may bring the mistreatment complaint to the attention of any CCOM faculty member, a course or clerkship director, Faculty Learning Community Director, or a collegiate dean.  All complaints of mistreatment received by a course or clerkship director of mistreatment will be subsequently reported to the Student Dean for appropriate action.

    The Dean of the College of Medicine, or the Dean’s designee, shall investigate a complaint of mistreatment pursuant to this policy or will make a referral to an appropriate University office for investigation of the mistreatment complaint.  When matters are investigated by the Carver College of Medicine, the Dean or the Dean’s designee will promptly issue a response to the student, and will determine whether it is more likely than not that mistreatment occurred.  When possible, the response to the student will be issued within 10 working days after the complaint is received by Dean of the College of Medicine or the Dean’s designee.  Investigations of mistreatment handled by other University departments may take longer to resolve.

    Whenever possible, the report and any subsequent investigation will be handled confidentially.  Unless requested by the student, the process of investigation and resolution will attempt to avoid meetings between the student and respondent.

    Appealing a Finding of Mistreatment:

    A student who is dissatisfied with the outcome of an academic complaint against a faculty member at the collegiate level may ask the Office of the Provost to review the matter. At any time, the student may also file a formal complaint with the University that will be handled under the procedures established for dealing with alleged violations of the Statement on Professional Ethics and Academic Responsibility as specified in section III-15 of the University Operations Manual. A description of these formal procedures, found in section III-29 and following of the University Operations Manual, can be obtained at http://www.uiowa.edu/~our/opmanual/  

    12. FERPA and access to academic files

    The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records.

    In short, no one may access a student’s academic file without the student’s consent except school officials who have a legitimate educational interest in the information.

    It is the policy of the Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum that Carver College of Medicine faculty members do not ordinarily have access to student academic files.  A student who wishes to permit a specific faculty member to review his or her file for the purpose of (for example) writing a letter of recommendation may do so by submitting a written note to OSAC, or by sending a statement of authorization by email on the student’s own email account to an appropriate staff member in OSAC, or by indicating permission on the ERAS letter of recommendation cover sheet distributed to M4s at the beginning of their senior year.  This statement of permission will normally be placed in the student’s academic file.

    Students may review their own academic file upon request in the Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum during normal business hours.  Student academic files may not be removed from the Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum.  Except as provided in the University’s Student Records Policy, or with the permission and assistance of OSAC staff, the contents of student academic files may not be photocopied.

    For further information regarding a student’s rights under FERPA, restriction of release of directory information, etc., see the Student Records Policy of the University of Iowa:

    http://dos.uiowa.edu/policy-list/current-policies-and-regulations-affecting-students-2011-2012-academic-year/student-rights-6/student-records-policy-6/

    Directory information, as defined by the University, may be released without the student’s consent, unless the student has specifically restricted certain items from release.