Biosciences Graduate Program

Amy Poremba, BS, PhD

Portrait

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Contact Information

Office: E124 SSH
Iowa City, IA 52242
Office Phone: 319-335-372

Email: amy-poremba@uiowa.edu
Web: More About Dr. Poremba - Related Websites and Resources

Education

BS, Psychology, University of Illinois-Urbana
PhD, Psychology, University of Illinois-Urbana

Post Doctoral, Psychology/Neurosci, University of Texas-Austin
Post Doctoral, Psychology/Neurosci, NIMH, Lab of Neuropysch

Education/Training Program Affiliations

Biosciences Graduate Program
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience

Research Summary

Central nervous system; complex functions underlying learning and memory by mapping metabolic and electrical activity within and between functional groups of cells The goal of Dr. Poremba's research is to understand how the central nervous system performs the complex functions underlying learning and memory by mapping metabolic and electrical activity within and between functional groups of cells. Is there one central learning circuit for sensory information or are there several circuits depending on the type of learning and the sensory modality? Dr. Poremba's laboratory group is identifying the neural functional maps underlying various types of learning including classical and operant conditioning using auditory, visual, olfactory and somatosensory stimuli, and spatial learning. By using the whole brain metabolic mapping techniques of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase (C.O.) histochemistry, the neural circuit differences between classical and operant conditioning, learning by reward versus punishment, acquisition vs. extinction, and the temporal-spatial resolution of acquisition vs. maintenance, of behavioral patterns using a variety of sensory cues are being delineated. This complement of techniques, 2-DG and C.O. histochemistry, can be completed in the same brain tissue to resolve two different questions, one, which structures are activated at the time of retrieval (2-DG), and two, which areas have sustained increases in energy need over the course of training (C.O.) suggesting storage of the memory or long-term involvement of these areas in the learning process. The neural circuits that are identified with the metabolic mapping techniques are then verified and refined in rodents and primates through permanent lesion and temporary inactivation studies as well as neuronal recording studies.

Date Last Modified: 06/07/2014 - 21:56:23