Pathology

Marcus Nashelsky, MD

Portrait

Chief Medical Examiner
Clinical Professor of Pathology  - Anatomic Pathology

Contact Information

Primary Office: 5244C Roy Carver Pavilion
Iowa City, IA 52242
Primary Office Phone: 319-353-7594

Email: marcus-nashelsky@uiowa.edu

Education

BA, University of Wyoming
MD, University of Nebraska College of Medicine

Residency, University of Missouri-Columbia Hospitals and Clinics
Fellowship, University of New Mexico School of Medicine

Licensure and Certifications

Diplomate, Forensic Pathology, American Board of Pathology
Diplomate, Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, American Board of Pathology

Research Summary

The autopsy is a low-tech, high-yield medical procedure firmly rooted in the history of medicine. It is an extraordinary tool for quality improvement of medical care, public heath and, most important, clear explanation of why a person has died. Few autopsies are performed in the United States (approximately 7% of deaths have an autopsy). This low utilization is not, fortunately, a challenge at UIHC (approximately 30% institutional autopsy rate). My primary research interests are the educational benefits of the autopsy and developing effective strategies for communicating this information.

Selected Publications

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Harris M, Massaquoi D, Soyemi K, Brend S, Klein D, Pentella M, Kraemer J, Nashelsky M, Schmunk G, Smith T, Pleva A.  Recent Iowa trends in sudden unexpected infant deaths: the importance of public health collaboration with medical examiners' offices.  The American journal of forensic medicine and pathology.  2012 June. 33(2):113-118.
[PubMed]

Nashelsky M.  Death certification-revisiting the primary CDC and NAME literature.  Forensic Pathology.  2012. 

Laczniak A, Sato Y, Nashelsky M.  Postmortem gastric perforation (gastromalacia) mimicking abusive injury in sudden unexplained infant death.  Pediatric radiology.  2011 December. 41(12):1595-7.
[PubMed]

Light T, Royer N, Zabell J, Le M, Thomsen T, Kealey G, Alpen M, Nashelsky M.  Autopsy after traumatic death--a shifting paradigm.  The Journal of surgical research.  2011 May. 167(1):121-4.
[PubMed]

Nashelsky M.  The death of SIDS.  Academic Forensic Pathology.  2011. 1:92-98.

Baumer T, Nashelsky M, Hurst C, Passalacqua N, Fenton T, Haut R.  Characteristics and prediction of cranial crush injuries in children.  Journal of forensic sciences.  2010 November. 55(6):1416-21.
[PubMed]

Taktakishvili O, Lin L, Vanderheyden A, Nashelsky M, Talman W.  Nitroxidergic innervation of human cerebral arteries.  Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical.  2010 August. 156(2-Jan):152-153.
[PubMed]

Zabell J, Nashelsky M, Thomsen T, Alpen M, Kealey G, Light T.  Rural versus urban trauma: demographic influences on autopsy rates.  The Journal of surgical research.  2009 July. 155(1):132-5.
[PubMed]

Dwyre D, Dursteler B, Nashelsky M, Friedman K, Raife T.  Value of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor in the postmortem diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.  Journal of clinical apheresis.  2009. 24(3):106-10.
[PubMed]

Oral R, Yagmur F, Nashelsky M, Turkmen M, Kirby P.  Fatal abusive head trauma cases: consequence of medical staff missing milder forms of physical abuse.  Pediatric emergency care.  2008 December. 24(12):816-21.
[PubMed]

Date Last Modified: 06/07/2014 - 21:56:23